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Wednesday, February 4, 2009

HISTORY MOST OF US NEVER KNEW BECAUSE OUR HISTORY TEXTBOOKS WERE MORE PROPAGANDA THAN HISTORY


MUSCLES, SNOW AND DOWN TO NEW ORLEANS....


I have spent the last several hours transferring documents and pictures from my old computer to an external hard drive. It is a personal computer and I have a MAC now, so nothing is going to be usable without my changing it from a "read only" document to another copy that I can edit. I have four mice - is that how you say the plural of mouse in relation to computers? - and the only one that would work at all with this old computer is so dysfunctional that it has to be hit repeatedly and hard to get it to respond. And having a strained muscle in my hand - I unwisely continued to do this for hours.

Just below are pictures of my backyard. Pictured is the second of many snowstorms here this season. One snowstorm a year would be enough for me to feel I had winter. Currently, I have opted to let last night's storm lie where it fell, as I must have pulled muscles in my rib cage the last time I shoveled. It may melt by Saturday and I can drive over it until then.

Pictured below is the same northwest corner of my lot as pictured just above.
I have always loved color...

Portsmouth, Aquidneck Island or otherwise the Island of Rhode Island

Now, down to New Orleans.....
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Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans

Faubourg Tremé premiered Thursday, January 29, 2009. Check Local Listings to see when it is airing on your local PBS station.

At this link http://www.pbs.org/faubourgtreme/ is a short clip of the film. And where I found this text:

Faubourg Tremé is considered the oldest black neighborhood in America, the origin of the southern civil rights movement and the birthplace of jazz. Long before Hurricane Katrina, two native New Orleanians, one black and one white — writer Lolis Eric Elie and filmmaker Dawn Logsdon — began documenting the rich, living culture of this historic district. Miraculously, their tapes survived the disaster unscathed. The completed film, Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans, which critics have hailed as "devastating," "charming" and "revelatory," brims with unknown historical nuggets. Who knew that in the early 1800s while most African Americans were toiling on plantations, free black people in Tremé were publishing poetry and conducting symphonies? Who knew that long before Rosa Parks, Tremé leaders organized sit-ins and protests that successfully desegregated the city's streetcars and schools? Who knew that jazz, New Orleans' greatest gift to America, was born from the embers of this first American civil rights movement? Lolis Eric Elie, a New Orleans newspaperman, takes us on a tour of the city — his city — in what evolves from a reflection on the relevance of history into a love letter to the storied New Orleans neighborhood Faubourg Tremé. Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans, executive produced by Wynton Marsalis and Stanley Nelson, will premiere on PBS in February 2009, a timely addition to the network's Black History Month programming (check local listings).
Irving Trevigne?s Ancestors

Craftsmen on Stoop-Master Carpenter Irving Trevigne's ancestors: Paul, Henry and Peter Broyard with two laborers outside Tremé building, circa late 1880/early 1890s.

Long ago, during slavery, Faubourg Tremé was home to the largest community of free black people in the Deep South and was a hotbed of political activism. Here, black and white, free and enslaved, rich and poor cohabited, collaborated and clashed to create America's first civil rights movement and a uniquely American culture. The Tremé district was damaged when the levees broke as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Many Tremé residents are still unable to return home, and the neighborhood is once again fighting many of the same civil rights battles first launched here 150 years ago. Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans celebrates the resiliency of this community and explores how it managed to carve out a unique and expressive culture and history that is still enriching America and the world.

Elegant Portrait of an Anonymous Free Man of Color

Elegant Portrait of an anonymous Free Man of Color, circa 1860.

To find out more about Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans please visit http://www.tremedoc.com/...

where this text is from

Lolis Eric Elie, a New Orleans newspaperman, takes us on a tour of the city – his city – in what becomes a reflection on the relevance of history folded into a love letter to the storied New Orleans neighborhood, Faubourg Tremé. Arguably the oldest black neighborhood in America and the birthplace of jazz, Faubourg Tremé was home to the largest community of free black people in the Deep South during slavery and a hotbed of political ferment. Here black and white, free and enslaved, rich and poor cohabitated, collaborated, and clashed to create America's first Civil Rights movement and a unique American culture. Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans is a riveting tale of heartbreak, hope, resiliency and haunting historic parallels.

While the Tremé district was damaged when the levees broke, this is not another Katrina documentary. Long before the flood, two native New Orleanians—one black, one white—writer Lolis Eric Elie and filmmaker Dawn Logsdon, began documenting the rich living culture of this historic district. Miraculously, their tapes survived the disaster unscathed. The completed film, Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans, which critics have called "devastating", "charming", and "revelatory" is a powerful testament to why New Orleans matters, and why this most un-American of American cities must be saved.

Elie and director Dawn Logsdon make clear the city's present, up through Katrina, remains steeped in its past- one that, for New Orleans, naturally includes an emphasis on music, heightened here by Derrick Hodge's original jazz score and over a hundred years of New Orleans music. This is a film of ideas, a historical film, a personal film and a celebration of place.

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